Category: Tips

what does ending on a wrong side row mean

Ending on a wrong side row

Ending on a wrong side row

What does it mean when you see the words “ending on a wrong side (ws) row? This often confuses knitters. Does it mean I’m about to start a wrong or right side row next?

When your pattern tells you to end on a wrong side row it means that the last row you knit is the one on the wrong side (hidden side) of your project. So if you are knitting in stocking stitch (stockinette) the last row you work is a purl row so that you are ready to knit the next row. In other words the last row you work is on the bumpy side or the inside of your project, ready to work the right side (rs) or outside next.

What happens though if you are working in garter stitch? So every row is knit. How will you know if you’ve ended on the wrong side? Often your pattern will tell you at the start which row is the right side (rs) at the start. If it doesn’t you can decide yourself because both sides are the same. To identify which is the right or wrong side in garter stitch, use a stitch marker or a piece of a different coloured yarn tied to one side to guide you. Of course if you are doing this, make sure to take a note of which side you’ve put the marker!

How does this all translate to crochet? Again your pattern may tell you which side is which but if not you can once again use a marker as a guide when you start your project. Some crochet stitches just look nicer on one side than the other so pick which side looks best to be the right side of your work.

Can I bring my knitting needles on a plane

Can I bring my knitting on the plane? Are knitting needles allowed in carry on bag? We’re asked this question all the time so decided to find out for sure.

Fur pompoms – how to make your own

Fur pompoms are so popular for knitted hats and adding to loads of accessories so we decided to play around with our new favourite Sirdar Alpine to see if we could make our own.  This gorgeous fur yarn is usually knit on size 10mm needles but for this project we used 5mm to give a closer knit. We started by casting on 16 stitches and knit 16 rows but you can do as many stitches and rows as you like to get the size of pompom you want.

Cast off and fold the piece in half lengthwise. Sew up across the bottom and along the side. We used embroidery thread for sewing, easier than trying to thread the Alpine through a needle and a bit stronger than regular sewing thread.

Turn right side out and fill with stuffing. Sew a gathering seam across the top and pull up tight to secure, leaving a long thread to use for sewing onto your hat or wherever you want to attach your pompom.

Our pompom took 8 metres of yarn and considering Sirdar Alpine has 33 metres per ball, at just €4.50 a ball you’ll have a cheap alternative to furry pompoms. Remember to let us know how yours work out by commenting here or posting a picture on Facebook  or Instagram 

Rico Design Pompon Baby Pink Loza Wool Dublin

How much wool do I need?

How much wool do I need to buy?

This is a common question and leads to many debates in the shop. Have you ever run out of yarn for your project or ended up with loads left over? Why? Let’s look at how much wool you need for your project and how to be sure you don’t run out.

You have been using the same baby cardigan pattern for years and you always make it from one 100g ball of double knitting yarn. So obviously any 100g ball of double knitting will give the same result, or two 50g balls even….right? Maybe not.

Imagine you unrolled a ball of yarn and laid it out straight on the floor, then measured the length of it. The measurement you get is the yardage/meterage of the yarn and will be shown on the ball band. So surely if both balls are 100g they’ll measure the same length. Not always.

Yarn can be made from a variety of different materials – wool, cotton, bamboo, acrylic or a mixture of two or more materials. Each of these different materials weigh differently, therefore a 100g ball of 100% wool is probably going to measure shorter than 100g of acrylic because wool is heavier than acrylic.

Let’s look at an example:

how much wool

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The image on the left is the label from a 100g ball of double knitting yarn, made from 100% acrylic as shown. The one on the left is a 50g ball of double knitting yarn, made from a mix of wool, cashmere and acrylic. So will two balls of the 50g yarn be the same as one ball of the 100g? Let’s look at the yardage (length)…the 100g ball has 295 metres in a ball whereas the 50g ball has 125 metres in a ball, two balls (100g) therefore will give us only 250 metres in length, leaving us short 45 metres. Now is it starting to make sense?

It is all a bit baffling but the most important thing to remember when buying yarn is to look at the yardage required rather than the weight. Still confused? That’s what we are there for. You may have seen us in the past comparing ball bands and getting the calculator out. Or maybe we have advised you that the pattern that requires one 100g ball will need three balls of the 50g yarn you’ve chosen and in your head you’ve probably thought we were mad!!! Always ask your yarn shop to calculate the amount of yarn you need and if you follow these tips you’ll hopefully never run short for a project again.

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